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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have some opportunities to fish on a few private biats this year and I have a question for you PB'ers. Now I know I need to be first with the cash (for expenses) and last in the Truck (Clean up the boat).

As far as rigs, How many should I bring. I own 7 outfits and I know rod space can be limited what do you suggest?

Dan
Who Created Your Fish?
 

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I've had friends bring as many as 10 outfits on my boat..It's not a problem as I have plenty rod holders. (well over 30) I lost count.. however best to ask your host how many would be appropriate and go from there. Minimum would be 3, 1 each 20# 30# and 40# and perhaps a trolling rig. Tackle boxes can also present a space problem. Just ask the host ahead of time.
Of course it all depends on the type of fishing and species you will target.
eg: Sand bass on the flats you would probably only need 2 outfits.
 

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RustyHook said it best, ask the person you're going with how many you should bring. we've got about 23 rod holders now on our boat, Rusty has 30, the next guy might have 10, someone else might have 5, ect.... every boat is different, so just ask ahead of time.

and by the way, being first with the money and last back in the truck is a GREAT way to get invited back.

Gettin' Ugly
Glendon
 

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We all have our quirks, I personaly when I see the guest coming down the dock and each one has two handfulls of rods,ice chest, huge tackle boxes, suit cases I get a little nervous,, Their's only so much room on each vessel, Then there's the safety factor luggage boxes etc shifting around tripping over things when the weather kicks up, On our boat before any one gets there the icechests our ready tackle shouldn't be a problem, We keep on board hooks, line, sinkers, Just how much does a person need on a one or two day trip??? I have been on friends boats, I bring at the outside two rods a very small box the size of a lunch bucket if that, I'm in there, Years back I used to ride the Deigo boats, Two rods, one trolling one bait in my pocket some hooks and some rubber core, Worked for me, The pitching in on expences is a must with todays prices, The cleanup, some people have a routine and would rather do it them selves, Thats me, When we hit the dock you can jump ship like a bunch of rats, Doesn't bother me, You can hang around an have a couple beers an tell lies thats all part of it, Good luck on your trips, Glenn on Pacified, VHF # 69
 

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As stated above, guests should ask the skipper about how many rigs to bring. I think a backpack works best for all other tackle. I've got one that I stuff with Plano boxes. It fits plenty of tackle for a 2-3 day trip. It's soft so it does not waste space (like a hard box), it tends not to slide and it stows well. And it's not too large. Obviously it's nice of a guest to offer to bring food, drink and ice and that can be coordinated with the skipper.

Other than the food etc., I guess I'm saying that imo a guest can reasonably walk aboard with however many rigs have been discussed (3-7 probably) plus a backpack for tackle plus a duffle for clothes other gear.
 

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excellent point rob. i too bring a backpack with me when i've fished on someone else's boat. plenty of room for a couple of plano boxes and i'm able to stuff a sweatshirt or rags, or whatever else in it and it takes up very little room.

Gettin' Ugly
Glendon
 

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My 2 cents....

Each boat, owner and trip are different, so there will never be a one size fits all scenario.

However, it's pretty easy to insure you all have an enjoyable trip and simply run down a few questions with the skipper to get a feel for the trip, the boat, the crew list and general expectations or plan. The worst approach is to simply assume the conditions and allowances, simply because that's what was ok on the last boat.

You may feel like you're bugging the skipper, but trust me..., they will appreciate your effort to gauge things ahead of time.

In general...

- Soft bags are better than hard bags (tackle boxes).

- Rods longer than 7 ft don't work well on most private boats, unless you have a clear section in the bow or there's a very light load in the cockpit.

- Organization in advance is always a good thing (meaning, organize your gear and determine what you actually need in terms of gear and tackle vs what you 'want').

- Organization on the boat prior and during the trip is also really good thing. Picking up and storing gear during the trip is always a good idea. Boats are only so big and keeping things organized really helps, especially when fishing with multiple anglers.

- Plan general food, beverage and ice chest arrangements in advance. Always appreciated, even if you hear, simply bring what you'd like to eat and drink. Bringing a little extra for the pot for your newfound best friends is a good way to make bonus points, even if they don't eat it. More food than less isn't a bad thing.

- Feel free to ask where you can help and if the skipper says it's covered and relax, then relax...., but observe. Finding small ways to help (pick up, organize, prep snacks, offer occasional soft drinks, water to the bridge, store ropes, fenders, etc. are always easy ways to 'join' the crew.

- At the beginning of the trip, get a run down on safety gear, location, and emergency procedures associated with the boat and crew. Get to know the basics of the boats operation, even if it is simply by observation.

- At the end of the trip, advance help to store gear, wash gear, organize, clean galley, salon, bathrooms, etc. as the boat is heading back, always helps everyone go home early and you don't need to ask the skipper in advance....., surprise him / her...

Always a good thing as like Glen (and Rob), I'm often shooing people away as sometimes it's easier to do the routine alone, than oversee a new crew. Taking care of the cabin, prewashing gear or stains while on route home can be a nice plus as well.

- Clean up at the dock? Well, if you're going to join the clean up party, then party hard and getting the boat into a better condition than she left the dock is a big pleaser. Scub hard and have fun while doing it. Everyone is a little beat, so a little humor or some cheer goes a long way to capping that trip with a great memory.

- Fish? Hopefully, you or someone else in the crew already dealt with cleaning the fish. Splitting the fish? Personally, I view fishing on a PB is a team effort, so the catch is split among the crew equally. If one feels differently, this is one of those things that's good to work out in advance before one leaves the dock as fishing a PB isn't like fishing a six-pack or sporty, allot of guys simply split the efforts of the day. Not a big deal to me either way, but one of those things that's worth clarifying ahead of time. Kind of like ordering Chinese food. Do you guys want to order separately or put everything in the middle and share? Both ways work, but it's wise to clear it up before you grab the egg roll on your buddies plate... :)

Money? If the agreement is to split expenses, share expenses, etc., then work it out the details with the other crew and don't make the skipper be the accountant too. I personally don't enjoy that part, even if splitting costs was the agreement in advance..., it's simply a downer for me as I view people on my boat as guests, so if someone takes the initative, figures it out and shoves it into my hands, over all my protests, even if I find a way to hand it back..., that boy's going out again. Please don't bring the skipper into a nit-pick over expenses, work it out between the crew well before the end of the trip or at least get a general agreement. Keep a mindset of bringing solutions to the skipper, not problems..., that's always a good thing and keeps spirits high.

If money is tight that week or you'd like to work something out, talk about it before you go on the trip, get an estimate or agree on what you can do. It's not so much for the captain, but for your other crewmates...., on a boat, it's all about communication as they are all too small for hard feelings, so work in advance to avoid them. Heck, some guys are happy just to have the company, so you'd be surprised what a little communication can do for you.

- Damage? Well, Sh$t does happen..., after all.., it's a boat. The key here is being observant and try to avoid the simple things that could cause damage.

Don't set your bags or gear on top of varnished surfaces or waxed fiberglass surfaces and don't slide anything across them.

Watch your jigs when you fling and watch them as you retrieve. Winding a jig into the side of the hull isn't a good way to win bonus points from the skipper.

Clean spills / stains as they happen or as you notice.

Don't carry pliers or tools in your rear pockets (not good for upholstery.

Wipe feet before heading into salon and keep hands washed / rinsed constantly (even if it's a salt water rinse..., those scales can show up everywhere.. :)

If something major happens that you might be involved with, concerned with or something you simply screwed up over, talk it over with the skipper and work it out then. Life's too short to lose a friend over unclear feelings or communications.

- One other thing John reminded me of....., never, flick a switch on the circuit breaker panel without the skippers knowledge (first mate's excepted) and get a run down from the skipper on other do's and donâ??ts of any electrical gear, settings, switches and general concerns.

- It basically boils down to observe, anticipate, and ask.

- Last and not least, be fun and have fun!! Bring an attitude and be the person you'd like to hang out with for a day. Fishing isn't just about the fish...., it's about the adventure!

Ok, so maybe it was more than just my 2 cents... :)

Cheers, Bill




â??If your not part of the solution... you're part of the problem"
 

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Set the bar as high as you can, [blink]I LOVE IT![/blink]

Responses like yours allow us all to fish more often!

I have my routine also.
Don't touch or do nuthin' unless you were asked to! :eek:

That is one well thought out, exceptional, detailed, thorough, great response Bill! :7

THANK YOU!

John.
Parker 2320 'FloMar'.
 

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Bill's comments are a treatise on being a boat guest. And it's all more than worth it to fish his beautiful rig, the PlayNHooky which I have been fortunate to do. And the fact that Bill follows his own guidelines on others' boats is probably why he is one of my valued trusted regular fishing buddies on my boat Magellan.
 

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I'm the galley bitch....on my boat, and others! I do the shopping, plan the meals, prepare, clean up, ensure that all are happy and full! Is it health food....definitely not, but are the crew happy and bellys full, without a doubt! There are few of us with Galley down design's that can withstand rough conditions and be able to cook for a crew for an entire meal....some can....some can't...that's my role! Part of the team and the more you become a valued part of a team, you will continue to be invited and respected! Find your role and own it!
 

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And of course along with that, the bilge bitch, fish finding bitch, rigging bitch, ect ect, you get the picture!

Edit: Got a kick out of Bill's point on the circut panel! I lock my panel and keep the key in my pocket....kid's and parents alike love to flip switches! As for money...on fishing trips, I like to be the bad guy and do the accounting for the skip and collect the money...it's not fair for the skip to perform this task, so I usually volunteer! It's a simple spreadsheet process that spreads the costs evenly and doesn't saddle the skip with the majority of costs associated. As an owner, I know how uncomfortable this situation can be, so I take ownership of this process when fishing with friends.
 

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Well, well, well...another member of Team Magellan shows up. A finer galley biatch I've never seen...and it's not healthy food but it's GOOD!! Bill M needs no invite to step on my boat!!
 

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Bill said it best. Three major points: Ask the boat owner how many rods are acceptable, some boats are already loaded and some aren't. I personally provide troll and jig gear, bait sticks are personal like underwear, each can bring two max. Money- I have never had problems with this- but I always eat money on each trip, few people have a realistic idea on how much it costs to run a boat to Clemente for two days- sorry pal, $40.00 won't cover it. Most important- fish or no fish, a good attitude is more valuable than gas money.
 

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GREAT post bill.



>- At the beginning of the trip, get a run down on safety gear,
>location, and emergency procedures associated with the boat
>and crew. Get to know the basics of the boats operation, even
>if it is simply by observation.

GREAT point, and i'd like to add to this. if you're going on someone else's boat, that you've never been on before, and especially if it's someone from here or another site that you've never met, ask a TON of questions before you agree to get on the boat. what electronics do you have? do you have backup electronics (handhelds?), are there gonna be extra gas cans on the deck? how many fire extinguishers do you have? will i be expected to operate the boat? how many bilge pumps do you have? what year is the boat? blah blah blah. there are a LOT of guys on this board that i'd be more than willing to put my life in their hands by going on their boat, but i'm sure there are some that i'd go locally with, but i'd never go offshore with, and some that i'd never set foot on their boat. you need to make sure you trust whoever you're going with before you agree to go with them. because you really are putting your life in their hands when you're on the ocean.

>Splitting the fish? Personally, I view fishing on a PB is a team >effort, so the catch is split among the crew equally.

i couldn't agree more. that's how we do it on our boat. but bill's right, talk about that AHEAD of time, because if you go on the boat thinking you're gonna keep what you caught, and walk away from the boat with what you did catch and don't share, you'd never be back on our boat again.

>Watch your jigs when you fling and watch them as you retrieve.
>Winding a jig into the side of the hull isn't a good way to
>win bonus points from the skipper.

this goes from dropping lead on the deck as well.


Gettin' Ugly
Glendon
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Wow, Bill, That is a Treatise on being a guest. Excelent advice!!! The "observe, anticipate and ask" is a great focus. I am always wondering should I do this or grab that? Thanks All!!

Dan
Who Created Your Fish?
 

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So now that we all know what to do as a guest.....maybe the next thing is what not to do.......any idea's?



Anyone?

:p :p :p
 

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I had a guest last year take a pee in my milk cup.
I've never drank milk from it again!

We joke about it now, and just wait until I see his Corn Flakes in a bowl.

John.
Parker 2320 'FloMar'.
 

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C'mon...you know I was just observing the first rule of being a boat-guest...just like the Hippocratic oath Doctors take: "first of all...do no harm!!" Hard to do much harm asleep in a chair :)
 

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Well if I ever get to fish on Rob's beautiful Cabo....I plan to bring 15 rods, bring lots of donuts and drop crumbs everywhere, bring my long range wood tackle box and sleep when the boat scrubbin starts.......:)

And catch all the big fish too!!!
 
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