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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Listen to this mayday call, it will send chill down your back and may you re-think your priority on crew training and emergency equipment list. This happen off the Oregon Coast.

http://www.d13publicaffairs.com/clients/uscg-13/60358.wav

The full Coast Guard story http://www.d13publicaffairs.com/go/doc/21/124837/

Also posted under main discussion

To help you understand more about swells and wind to help you make a better decision on when to go on the water or stay in port. Boating smart.

This info came from another site.

Examples (waves break, swell does not)
10x20, 4X20, 20x15, 10x8, or any combination of the two sets, stated as thus, ten by twenty, four by twenty, twenty by fifteen, etc, etc.
These first sets of numbers (lets say10) represents the swells height in fe, is always stated first. The second set of numbers (lets say 20) represents the swell period or duration. This period or duration is a measurement of seconds. Measured from the top height of one swell to the top of the next coming swell. This is how many seconds it takes for the swell to pass under you if you were standing still.
OK, now pretend youâ??re in your boat. And letâ??s say the conditions called for 10X20 seas. Wave height is 10 feet by 20 seconds. Now counting in seconds, from 1 to 20, thatâ??s how long it takes your boat to ride from the top of one swell down the face 10 feet to the bottom at zero foot, and then ride back up again 10 foot to the top of the next swell.
Thatâ??s a nice long gentle role, a big valley, a roller coaster ride. Now if we reduce the swell period or duration between wave heights, we begin to see that weâ??re going up and down at a much steeper angle and doing it a lot faster. Taking a 10x8 swell period, we would be racing/surfing down 10 feet every 4 seconds and power motoring back up 10 foot in another 4 seconds. Thatâ??s real steep and not to much fun to be in. Plus visibility is greatly reduced because weâ??re in these deep troughs. A 6x6 is every 6 seconds youâ??re traveling up and down 6 feet. Unless youâ??re in a big vessel you canâ??t go far or fast in those kind of conditions.
Ideally, the further apart the swell or duration period the better a vessel, especially a smaller craft, can take on swell heights
Then on top of the stated swell heights and periods are the Breaking Wind Waves heights if any, caused by wind alone. They are a totally separate breaking wave and not swell at all. These are wind breaking waves, frothy white water rollers. The wind creates these waves depending on how long, strong and fast the wind is or has been blowing. They can be any additional height stated on top of what the swell height is. So if the swell height stated is 10 feet and the wind waves are 4 feet, that means were in 14 feet over our heads.
In San Francisco Bay area~Then to back all that up is the wind. Which, you can usually count on to come up by most mid afternoons. Our predominate North West swell makes it easy for us to always know which way land is.
Now when thereâ??s a storm say from the South. This can bring another set of swells from that storms direction, with its own wind and wind waves. Now add to that, the normal NW swell, and we have a washing machine effect, or confused seas. This makes for a very unpleasant boat ride.

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Each area has their own prominent swells and wind direction~Learn yours.
I'm always concerned about the wind and wind directions when making my decisions in addition to swells. Winds from the wrong directions can turn a ocean into a washing machine effect where water is jumping up and down all around you very quickly even in moderate swells.

Those permanent hand print in my aluminum boat windshield support and button holes in the seats didn't come from watching seagulls.

Bill Shelton
"Drive the point home and then let them go!"
Helping our fishery resources is everybody's business!
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Update on Saved boater remains in hospital care
Monday, July 17, 2006 from the Orgonian

One of three boaters plucked Friday from the Pacific Ocean off Tillamook remained hospitalized Sunday.

Elmer Kerry "Sandy" Killian, 61, of Waldport was in stable condition at Samaritan Pacific Communities Hospital in Newport.

Two companions, Steve Harrison, 56, of Tidewater and Bob Templin, 53, of Portland were released from the hospital Saturday.

Harrison said Templin was the boat owner and captain. He also said Killian placed a mayday call, but declined to comment further until he spoke to Killian, perhaps today. Templin could not be reached for comment Sunday.

The three men spent nearly seven hours in the ocean in water temperature as low as 65 degrees.

They had been on a tuna fishing trip, but the 25- to 28-foot pleasure boat sank an estimated 45 miles from shore in 800-foot-deep waters.

Coast Guard rescuers heard the boat's mayday call about 1:30 p.m. Friday. Four helicopters and a C-130 search plane were sent out.

The Coast Guard located the men about 8 p.m., clinging to an ice chest. One man was wearing a life vest.

A Coast Guard helicopter from Air Station Astoria lifted them from the water.

Bill Shelton
"Drive the point home and then let them go!"
Helping our fishery resources is everybody's business!
 
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