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Hey Rob- I too have been fishing all my life and also a short term boat owner-just 4 years now. The most important thing that I have learned is to just take it slow- whether it's out running the boat, towing to launch ramp or just fixing/upgrading it on trailer in front yard. READ everything you can. Never stop taking in info. You will get some of your best info here on the boards. Always stay as current as you can on the weather conditions.

As far as fishing goes, listen to how everyone has been doing, where they are doing it at and what I think is the biggest element in the fishing/boating learning curve- Time Spent On The Water.

You'll do just fine. Have fun and welcome to the club.
 

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welcome to allcoast!!! glad to have you aboard. and congrats on the new boat!!!!! that's a perfect boat for inshore and catalina when the weather's good.

are you available to fish during the week? or only weekends?


Gettin' Ugly
Glendon
 

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Thanks for the welcome! I already have some leisure-time/commode reading lined up. I just ordered a copy of "In the Gray" and "Between Two and Twenty Fathoms". Any other suggested reading?

I know there are many much hardier boats than my Triumph, but I basically bought it to do light tackle/saltwater fly stuff. My 195CC has a perfect front casting deck. I'm sure down the road I'll upgrade to something larger/nicer, but I think this is a good starter boat.

I am available both weekdays and weekends. Just need to plan my weekday trips a day or two in advance.
 

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Welcome to ALLCOAST Rob!

You might want to p/u this book also.



http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0688168906/102-0575211-4308964?v=glance&n=283155


John.
Parker 2320 'FloMar'.
 

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>Welcome to ALLCOAST Rob!
>
>You might want to p/u this book also.
>
>

>
>http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0688168906/102-0575211-4308964?v=glance&n=283155
>
>
>John.
>Parker 2320 'FloMar'.


JSeas suggestion is a good one. Though there are only a few pages on handling rough water conditions ( I was hoping for more ) but it is the reference standard. I bought it. Makes a hell of a paper weight in my office.
I saw this also at the Library so you may want to consider a trip to the local library rather than spend the $60 or a personal copy.

TheHullTruth.com is also a good resource as is trailerboats.com. Try searching for all the boating and trailering errors people make so you can avoid them.

I've yet to do this but I think it is a good idea: Checklist.
Make a checklist of all the items you should bring or do while launching. I forgot my fish finder once and left the straps on the back of the boat while launching (couldn't figure why the boat would not come off the trailer :) ). The list helps with the simple things that you tend to forget if something changes or goes wrong.

Other than that, ask questions as there are lots of people that will help.
 

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a checklist is a wonderful idea. raise your hand if you've ever forgot to put the plug in before launching. and we've left the net at home, the gaff at home, fishing license, hell, i even left the tackle bag at home once. it's amazing what you'll forget at 3 or 4 in the morning. i know half the time i'm not thinking straight that early.

just put EVERYTHING on the list that you can think of. from fishing boots to the plug to electronics to rods/reels. then laminate it, get a dry erase pen and put one diagonal line next to the item if it goes in the truck for the ride to the ramp, or an x next to it if it goes in the boat for the ride down. then when you get to the ramp, everything that has a single line next to it, put the other line to form the x when you take it out of the truck and into the boat. takes the guess work out of it. well, that works for me anyway when i go hooping.

do you have a bait tank on your boat? what do you have for electronics?


Gettin' Ugly
Glendon
 

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I've been fishing all my life, but I am a new to Allcoast. I just bought my first boat, a 2006.5 Triumph 195CC. I hope to do a little inshore and island fishing in it when conditions are favorable. I live in Simi Valley, but I'm not opposed to driving down to any harbor/launch spot in So Cal.

I know there's a lot for me to learn before charging offshore. I want to fish safely and successfully with my new boat. This board is going to be a great resource, but there's no substitute for first-hand experience.

That's why I would like to try to connect with more experienced anglers, and hopefully have them go out with me to show me how to "do it right". I realize that everyone's time is precious, and time on the water is even more so. I'd like to make this worthwhile for all parties involved. I'll cover all fishing-related expenses; (fuel, bait, etc.) Just bring your knowledge.

If you're interested, email me: [email protected]hia.net

Thanks.

Rob B.
LARRC, AFSA, UA, RFA member
 

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Take a basic seamanship/navigating course from the USCG Aux or US Power Squadron. They are inexpensive but will be the single most valuable thing you can do to get started.

Its been about 35 years since I took the course and I still use the knowledge gained. Learn how to navigate using just a paper chart, compass and a watch. Once you become proficient doing that you can start using your electronics to save a little work.
 

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I really appreciate the suggestions and tips. I'll start working on my checklist tonight. When I get done, maybe I can run it by someone to see if I missed anything?

Today I talked with a tackle shop owner who used to be a charter boat captain. He also suggested taking a seamanship course with the Coast Guard Auxilliary. That seems like a very smart move.

My boat has a 25gal aerated & illuminated baitwell with a 900GPH pump. I have a Garmin 198C GPS/chartplotter and Lowrance LVR-850 VHF radio. I also have a backup handheld Standard Horizon HX270S VHF radio. I bought paper charts for backup.
 

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The one suggestion I would make is to get some safe, realtime experience in not-so-nice conditions in your boat, AFTER YOU HAVE TAKEN THE COAST GUARD AUXILIARY COURSE AND PUT SOME HOURS ON THE BOAT. It's better to learn how your boat handles this BEFORE you are forced to learn it in a life/death situation. I went years boating in nothing that radical before I got caught in a big sea, big blow situation off San Quintin in a 19 foot aluminum boat. I was up by San Martin island. In retrospect, I was an idiot for being out there in those conditions. That experience taught me alot, but it also taught me that I need to feel a boat's tendencies in snot.

With my last few boats, I've launched when I knew that conditions were REALLY snotty (around 20-25 knot winds with 1-3 foot windchop), just to see how it handled. Going into the seas, with the seas, quartering seas, varying the speeds and trim angles, etc. Pay particular attention to what type of piloting you need to do to avoid plowing the nose into a wave, since I assume your boat has an open bow.

I did all this just outside the entrance to the breakwater where I launch, so that if I got in trouble the Harbor Patrol and Vessel Assist were minutes away. One of the days, the local CG guys were testing maneuvers with guys in the water just a hundred yards from where I was.

Best to prepare for worst-case scenarios before they arrive. You need to feel a little of the fear of the ocean so that you can deal with it in a bad situation.

There's a Joseph Conrad lesson in there, somewhere.
 
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