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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all, just had my offer accepted on my first boat, so I decided to stop lurking on this great board and join in the conversations. I'm looking for some basic info, and please excuse any/all dumb questions.

A little about what I intend to use the boat for, and my experience -
It will mainly be used as a weekend get-away for my family (wife, two young boys). Hang out at the harbor, let the boys play, fish, etc.

I hope to get out fishing as often as I can (afford with fuel), which at most would be every weekend; likely every other weekend. I have zero experience navigating a boat on the ocean - I grew up on lakes and rivers. Lots of freshwater fishing experience, and have been tuna fishing 3-5 times a year for the last 5 years.

What is a good, reliable radio that won't break the bank?
Favorite on-line merchant or catalog for equipment, accessories, tackle, etc.?
Anyone know of a good site or article for new boaters?

Link to the boat I'm buying is below, what do you see that I need? (not want, since that list is already long and growing more expensive by the day)

Edit - corrected the link below


Thanks in advance for any assistance.

Lance



http://www.yachtworld.com/core/listing/pl_boat_detail.jsp?&units=Feet&checked_boats=1586762&lang=en&slim=broker&&hosturl=breakwater&&ywo=breakwater&
 

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>my first boat,

>
>I hope to get out fishing as often as I can (afford with
>fuel), which at most would be every weekend;



>I have zero experience navigating a boat on
>the ocean -

>What is a good, reliable radio that won't break the bank?

>Lance


Lance:
Considering your admitted lack of experience and need to economize on fuel (who doesn't), I think you choose the perfect boat. The good news is that it comes with two radios, so no need to even damage the bank on that one.
Good luck,
Rick
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Looks like I made a mistake with the link, it only takes you to the main page for the broker. I'm getting the 34 Silverton, not the 50' yacht for half a million, lol.
 

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>Looks like I made a mistake with the link, it only takes you
>to the main page for the broker. I'm getting the 34
>Silverton, not the 50' yacht for half a million, lol.


Sorry for my sarcastic reply. I will remove if you like, but it seems like you see the humor. I wish I had some good advice responsive to your questions. The Silverton is a great boat to start with (and you may never out grow it), and your family is sure to have lots of fun, I know mine does.
-Rick
 

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Discussion Starter #5
No need to remove it, and actually, I want to thank you for replying - I was wondering why there were so many views but no replies. Now I know.
 

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First things first: 1) family safety- fit all members with correct fit lifejackets and adjust straps NOW..not later when an emergency occurs and you may only have seconds to get them on..Put names on front so each person can grab his/hers instantly...Do family drills in this, so, they react instantly without questions..take jackets out of storage pouch(most common error made) and keep them available for instant use on all offshore trips 2) do a radio check on the water to determine if you are broadcasting and receiving properly 3) get a cheap handheld or fixed GPS unit and learn to use it 4) buy a nautical map of the area you plan to cover and learn how to read latitude and longitude positions. Use compass, map and gps together so you always know your location offshore in the event the compass or gps fails 4) buy a Vessel Assist membership so you have cheap towing insurance in the event of a breakdown..5) take out an experienced sailor your first few trips so you can learn the ropes the easy way (proper anchoring, steering into rough swells, etc.) and not from a series of mistakes...:) Most of the rest is collecting all the stuff you need to have a fun, safe trip...Good luck. P.S. and, always check the weather and swell reports prior to heading out. It is amazing how many intelligent people forget this small but necessary procedure.
 

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Lance,
Welcome to the world of boating. The first thing you should do is take a Boating Safety and Seamanship course from the USCG-Aux or Power Squadron. You should have your wife attend as well. Great info that could save your family's life and give you confidence on the water.
 

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Have someone take you to the public main channel docks and practice approach and Docking procedures

this is of Great importance,I don't care if takes you all Day, You must become proficient at Handeling and close quarters manuevering
without this primary step you're going to Cause a hell of a lot of Damage


Radios are always Good

but you should have an experienced Mariner Go over the Boat with a fine toothed comb and make it safe.

foremost, and paramount to your Familys safety You need
to have a working High water alarm and multiple over sized working bilge pumps, with float switches and up to Date wiring and plumbing the most overlooked cause of catastrophe all it takes is an exhaust hose failure to flood the bilge

you must familiarize yourself Every detail of your Particular vessels Mechanics and it's operating characteristics. after learning the Radio, you need to understand Navigation
you'll need to purcahse a GPS chartpolotter and paper charts As back up

I can be reached @ [email protected] feel free to contac me if you have questions or need a crash course on where to start, in regard to what to spend $$$ on first
 

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All of the above plus:

1. Read, read, read!! Get on the web and google your way to lots of informative stuff. You will find things like "How to stock a ditch bag" which should be an immediate task for you. And many many other things which will prompt you to create a long list and priortize it. One of the best things about this sport is that it is an engaging passion/hobby even when you are not actually on the boat. You can constantly be working to grow your knowledge. Find buddies with boats with whom you can share knowledge.

2. I assume you had a competent surveyor do a full survey before purchase? If so, then his list is your starting point on critical safety-oriented maintenance and, if they are a nice guy, then a great source of selected questions.

3. Invite experienced boaters on your initial trips.

4. Take it slow slow slow. Do not be too ambitious at first. Start with small trips and work your way up as your comfort zone grows about your own skills/capabilities plus the boat's reliability and quirks (they all have quirks).

5. West Marine has almost everything you need...but not at the best price. Research the web, frequent the buy/sell boards, get familiar with places like Minney's and you'll get much better value. But, you can almost always get what you want quickly at Tiffany's aka West Marine LOL!

6. Have fun!!!

Good luck!
 

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My guess is you have already scared him enough that he decided against buying a boat or at the very least he's ready to sell the one he bought.

Everytime I read a post that asks for advice on boat ownership, a few of you guys go crazy and for some reason or another feel the need to overwhelm some poor sole who simply wants to enjoy the freedom of owning his own boat. Sure there are the obvious safety factors that need to be addressed, but for God's sake leave that which is common sense alone.

My advice would parallel Aloharob's, do a lot of reading and make your self aware of the in's and out's of your boat. Many things you will learn through trial and error. Every so called expert that has responded to this post has gone through the same tribulations that you will go through, so don't be dismayed. Have fun and be safe.

Jeff
The Dalton Boys
21ft Parker
 

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the hardest thing about boating is docking so here is my advice.

1) Go slow boats have no breaks!
2) Watch the wind it will push you!
3) Assume the other guy cant see you!
4) If you think your to close its to late!
5) Stay Calm dont panic that will cause more damage.
6) Did I say GO SLOW!

A boat going 5 MPH into a dock can and will sink it or damage a lot of glass and gel work.

Go in front of the harbor and do circles on a dine using both motors try to do it very slow without moving the boat forward or backwards or sidewards more then a boat length.

The dock fingers are only a little over a boats length apart and you are going to have to turn the boat 90% without going forward, backwards or sidewards and sometime while a wind is pushing you.

The first few times have someone in the back of the boat and the front to push you away if you get into trouble and remember they can only help if you are going real slow.

Don

but at last
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks all for the advice. Yes, I'm still getting the boat and haven't been swayed at all. In fact, I've thought of little else since I submitted the offer.

I have several friends with boats that have extensive experience that will be helping me get started.

The sea trial is Friday morning, and the survey will follow. I'm sure I'll have questions after those that I will be posting.

Thanks again for all of the help.

PS - In order to get the boat, my wife is making me sell my 70 Mach 1, $15k firm. Let me know if you're interested.

Lance
 

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I have been boating in our local waters for 23 years. Nite trips
and all. Feel free to call anytime for questions, buddy boating, or free docking lessons. John @ HARBOR AUTO SERVICE 949-574-1858..
No such thing as too many boating buddies, ya know !!!!
GOOD LUCK, AND THAT SILVERTON IS AWESOME. BIG TENTACLES OUT !!!
 
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