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I have a 13 lb. bone in grass fed prime rib roast that I would like to feed to a few guests. Should I cook it in the oven or on my Weber.Never done one before and I want it to come out perfect.

Any ideas ,procedures or recipes are much appreciated.


Thamks again,
Tom
 

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fishmore said:
I have a 13 lb. bone in grass fed prime rib roast that I would like to feed to a few guests. Should I cook it in the oven or on my Weber.Never done one before and I want it to come out perfect.

Any ideas ,procedures or recipes are much appreciated.


Thamks again,
Tom
Send it to me,I`ll cook it for you....:p
 

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My favorite way is buy about for that size 3/4lbs of ROCK SALT. Thats right rock salt. Tiny slits in the roast, many as you like an insert 1/2 galic clove. Put the roast on a cookie sheet an pack the outside like a snowball with the rock salt, 100%. U can use a little bit of water to insure a solid covering of salt. PILE it on.

The strange thing is, it does not absorb the salt like you would think. It turns out fantastic. When finished, the rock salt becomes a solid hunk of salt. Let it sit for about 10 min. then break it free. Outstanding

Ray
 

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Ray,they used to do it that way at a restaurant I worked at when I was a kid. That is a great roast. But I also like what AZ said.

2 great ways. You might have to go and get another roast and do them both!
 

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8)As IRON THROWER SAYS pack in in rock salt and I would put in the over at about 450 deg for about 20 min and then turn it down to 300 for about 3.5 hours depending on how well or RARE you want it.

LAWRYS (sp) Prime rib on La Cienega (sp) used to do them this way and it is super...:tu:

O Man and don't forget the FRESH GROUND HORSERADISH..

And a Nice Merlot....
and Yorkshire pudding...and
Oh yeah I can be there in about 2 weeks..

Happy trails,
sf
 

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Iron Thrower said:
My favorite way is buy about for that size 3/4lbs of ROCK SALT. Thats right rock salt. Tiny slits in the roast, many as you like an insert 1/2 galic clove. Put the roast on a cookie sheet an pack the outside like a snowball with the rock salt, 100%. U can use a little bit of water to insure a solid covering of salt. PILE it on.

The strange thing is, it does not absorb the salt like you would think. It turns out fantastic. When finished, the rock salt becomes a solid hunk of salt. Let it sit for about 10 min. then break it free. Outstanding

Ray

Dang Ray when is dinner I'll be right over...LOL
 

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fishmore said:
I have a 13 lb. bone in grass fed prime rib roast that I would like to feed to a few guests. Should I cook it in the oven or on my Weber.Never done one before and I want it to come out perfect. Any ideas ,procedures or recipes are much appreciated. Thamks again, Tom
DO NOT do it on the BBQ. If you've never done one like that before, you'll just FUBAR a great piece of beef! And I've had prime rib like Hollywood Ray, (Ironthrower), is suggesting. It's fantastic!
sportfisher_61 said:
O Man and don't forget the FRESH GROUND HORSERADISH..
ABSOLUTELY RIGHT!!! 8):tu:
sportfisher_61 said:
And a Nice Merlot...
Oh screw a Merlot! :\ I'd rather a nice full bodied Cab! :) (With something heavily chocolate for dessert! 8):tu: ) FISH HARD!

This post edited by Baja Dreamer 06/13/2008
 

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I've cooked one or two 16 lb prime ribs for my Christmas party every year for the past ten years and, after a couple of screw-ups when I started, I now have it down. Most important thing: buy a good meat thermometer. I like the digital type that allows you to leave the probe in the meat and it has a little cable that goes out of the oven to the display which sits on the counter next to the oven. A thermometer like that will cost less than twenty bucks and will last for decades. The whole thing about fifteen minutes per pound, or whatever, is bullsh!t. At best, that is a general guideline. If you follow that method you will screw it up as often as you get it right. If you want a good med. rare roast you bury that temp probe in the center of the roast (not near any bones) and pull that sucker out of the oven when the temp hits 124 degrees. And I mean 124, not 128. Let the roast sit on the stove top covered with a clean dish towel or a couple of shop rags for twenty minutes before carving. If you are going to hold it for more than twenty minutes, cover it with aluminum foil and then with a towel. You can hold it on the stove top for up to forty minutes that way and it will be fine. Before I put the roast in the oven I slather about a half cup of Kitchen Bouquet all over it. I then rub on a mixture of salt/spices that I make. The rub is generally about eighty percent sea salt with a bit of garlic powder, Lawrey' seasoning salt, pepper, and a couple of pinches of dried rosemary. Obviously, cook it bones down (using the bones as a cooking rack). With bigger ribs the roast will often roll on to its side rather than sit up on the rack of bones like it's supposed to. You can fix that problem by cutting a small onion into quarters and use the chunks as "chocks" to keep it from rolling by propping them under the roast. The onion just adds flavor to the au jus. Once you have it down it's a damn easy thing to do and you are frigging hero. Bill

This post edited by WJW 06/14/2008
 

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I too formerly worked in a dinner house and have cooked oodles of prime rib. We used the salt method described above, and it might be the most fool-proof, tasty method ever developed. We used rock salt, which I think is better for this. We just slathered it on, using enough to send a doctor into a fit, but it never tasted salty.

IMPORTANT--PLACE THE ROAST FAT SIDE UP, THEN PILE ON THE SALT. I like letting the meat rest about 10 minutes after cooking.

A couple of other hints--yorkshire pudding is a traditional side dish, but it needs to cook at a much higher temperature, so don't even think about cooking them together. If you have only one oven, then wash some russet potatoes, poke a few holes in them, and put in the oven 60-90 minutes before the roast is expected to be done, depending upon the size--niced and easy, and no pots to clean.

For the horserahish sauce that is often served with prime rib, just mix some prepared white horseradish into sour cream to taste.

Barbq and spits too can turn out some wonderful roasts, but those methods are trickier and the ending times less certain, due to the indirect and fluctuating heat.
 

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My wife goes along with WJW but uses only water in the pan. Perfect prime everytime. People ask for the recipe but she tells em it's a family secret. Duh...it's water & a thermometer. Better prime than Gelsons!
 

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I use the Weber,there's a million thing's you could rub it with but a incredible one is Scott's Santa Maria Style Rub.simple :
Buy the grates that mount to the in sides of the Weber that hold the coals on the sides,put a rectangular water pan underneath inbeetween the coals,fill with water,wine if desired.put the Rib on the grill in the center with the thermometer in it (be sure it dosen't touch the bone)when it reaches 165 degrees take it out(ck it every hr.)you may have to throw some coals on top of the one's burning from time to time,make sure the vents are clear on the bottom and open the top about 1/2,you won't believe, how good, slowly Roasted with the coals instead of the oven it tastes!
 

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You said 165 degrees. That must be a typo. I take my prime rib out at 124 degrees. If you take it out at that temp, the internal temperature will continue to rise for about fifteen minutes and (assuming you were cooking in an oven set around 325) the final peak temp will be right around 130-133 degrees. That makes for a nice med. rare roast. If you leave it in the oven till 165 degrees, by the time you carve the roast the internal temp will be something like 175 or more. That roast would be gray in the middle. No Bueno.:? Bill

This post edited by WJW 06/17/2008
 

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WJW said:
You said 165 degrees. That must be a typo. I take my prime rib out at 124 degrees. If you take it out at that temp, the internal temperature will continue to rise for about fifteen minutes and (assuming you were cooking in an oven set around 325) the final peak temp will be right around 130-133 degrees. That makes for a nice med. rare roast.

If you leave it in the oven till 165 degrees, by the time you carve the roast the internal temp will be something like 175 or more. That roast would be gray in the middle. No Bueno.:?

Bill
Maybe JPJ likes it well done? :? I agree with you WJW. If anything on a piece of meat like that I like it cooked less rather than more! :p


Chris
 

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Like WJW said, when you reach the desired temp. take it off. You have to remember, when broiling, baking, or using the BBQ, when you take off whatever your cooking, it will continue to cook for a few min even after you take it off. So if you want med. rare an take it off when whomever you received info from, it could get too well done after resting. I like mine still "mooing" with some great horsey mixture an some real good wine an a fine cigar afterwards. Heck, what does not go with a great Prime Rib roast?

Hollywood
 

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I sprinkle with Santa Maria salt and put on a rotisserie on the gas grill. More recently been putting on the Weber with mesquite charcoal piled on the sides. If you like smoked meat, boy it's tastey. Remote meat thermometer is the only way to go.
What does the pan of water do?
 
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