Coastal Fishing Forums: AllCoast banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can anybody recommend to me a good set up for Leopard Sharks from the surf? What is the minimum line I can use? My current set up has 12 lb line and I've realized that most Leopard sharks from the surf aren't too big....is 12 pound test too weak?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
358 Posts
brian21johansen said:
Can anybody recommend to me a good set up for Leopard Sharks from the surf? What is the minimum line I can use? My current set up has 12 lb line and I've realized that most Leopard sharks from the surf aren't too big....is 12 pound test too weak?
OK, I have done a little shark fishing from the beach years ago! IMO, your 12lb outfit is way too light! I would recomend nothing less than a 30lb outfit of your choice, and a light wire, or heavy mono leader. The hook size will depend on the bait, and the weight will have to be heavy enough to keep your bait in one place. Fish the tides, and fish a night......................:tu:

This post edited by Xlobsterman 05/25/2008
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the reply.....yea thats a nice shark you have in that picture....I didn't realize that they get that big....somebody told me they were only 3-4 feet long and not too heavy.

anyways I took some of the 12 pound mono of my reel and put some 50 pound power pro on it (12 pound diameter).....hopefully this works
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
358 Posts
brian21johansen said:
Thanks for the reply.....yea thats a nice shark you have in that picture....I didn't realize that they get that big....somebody told me they were only 3-4 feet long and not too heavy.
That shark in the pic was taken at Hen Rock, Catalina early one morning while fishing for WSB. Most leopard sharks I caught were in the 3-5ft range, but they can get much larger. Now, unless the DFG changed the regs the past few years, there is a 36" minimum size, and a 3 fish limit on them. They are great eating.............:tu: Here is a bit more info taken from the DFG web-site for you: Family: Carcharinidae (Requiem sharks) Genus and Species: Triakis semifasciata Description: The body of the leopard shark is elongate, and the snout is short and bluntly rounded. This shark is easily identified by the gray coloration over most of its body, and the black spots and crossbars on the back and side. It is white underneath. Range: Mazatlan, Mexico, to Oregon. This well decorated species is abundant in bays and along sandy beaches of southern and central California in shallow water. During the fall, large numbers may be found in San Francisco and Monterey Bays. Natural History: The leopard shark eats a variety of fishes and invertebrates like anchovies, squid or crab, all of which make good bait. Females, which bear their young live, usually produce 4 to 29 pups in a litter. Fishing Information: It is considered a relatively harmless shark and is timid around divers; nevertheless, handle a live leopard shark with care. The leopard shark is very good eating, and has been compared favorably to salmon. Other Common Names: cat shark. Largest Recorded: 7 feet; 70 pounds. Habitat: Bay Environment http://www.dfg.ca.gov/marine/mspcont5.asp#leopard EDIT: Here are the current regs for Leopard Sharks The recreational fishery for leopard shark (Triakis semifasciata) inside San Diego Bay, Mission Bay, Newport Bay and Alamitos Bay is open year-round to boat-based anglers, divers2 and shore-based anglers. Outside of the above-mentioned embayments, the fishery is open to boat-based anglers from March 1, 2008 through December 31, 2008. Outside of the above-mentioned embayments, the fishery is open year-round to divers2 and shore-based anglers. Outside of the above-mentioned embayments, leopard may only be taken or possessed4 in waters less than 360 feet (60 fathoms) deep (except in the Cowcod Conservation Areas - see below). The daily bag and possession limit is 3 fish with a minimum size limit of 36 inches total length. http://www.dfg.ca.gov/marine/mapregs5.asp#leopardshark_open And here is another link with some more info: http://www.dfg.ca.gov/marine/status/leopard_shark.pdf

This post edited by Xlobsterman 05/31/2008
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,434 Posts
12lb is okay as long as there is room for it to run, but use a heavier leader.

a tip:...drill a small hole through a wine cork and thread your 3' leader through the hole...the cork will slide up to the bait and keep it off the bottom..this will greatly reduce the amount of rays and skates you catch..you have to use a heavier sinker and you have to fish the tides ...without a little bit of current, the leader will get hopelessly wraped around your mainline...leopard sharks swim against the current to track down a bait
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
11,019 Posts
brian21johansen said:
Can anybody recommend to me a good set up for Leopard Sharks from the surf? What is the minimum line I can use? My current set up has 12 lb line and I've realized that most Leopard sharks from the surf aren't too big....is 12 pound test too weak?
It depends how your fishing. If your catching them on swimbaits twelve is fine. If your fishing bait and leaving it out for long periods of time I would go heavier. I like twenty pound on a reel that holds about three hundred to four hundred yards minimum, spinning gear with ten to 13ft Kencor surf rod. If I want to fish heavy I'll switch to a ten ft Harnell and a penn 525 Mag 30 spectra, and take a pole holder. If you want to catch big ones you want to use bait and the best bait is live surf perch. Macks will work so will frozen squid. I've hooked fish of Topanga on surf perch I could not stop on thirty but I would say those were T's or Whites not leapards. My largest leopard I released, though it was maybe just five ft plus they do get to six feet plus. For bigger sharks I also use wire not mono leaders about a foot long section of nylon coated wire albrighted on to the end. You can land a white on wire but not mono though you have to release them. The main problem in the surf is keeping the bait out there long enough for sharks to find it. I use spider sinkers, something we started making back in Texas when I was a kid. They have never caught on out here, don't ask em why, because they work great. Just drill 5/8 hole into a board or better aluminum, stick your wire in it and fill it with the right amount of lead.
They hold much better then any of the standard surf sinkers. Of course the longer it sits out there the more likely crap will collect on your line and chew it up. Kelp with barnacles is the worst. That's why you need heavier line for long bait sets. If your just starting out go with twenty and fish squid. You'll catch a lot of skates and rays but the will teach you how to work the fish in the surf. Don't force them, instead use the surf to your advantage. Most of the Leopards you get this way will be in the 3ft to 5f range which will put up a decent fight on twenty. Here's one I got on that gear up by point Magu.
I envy you. It's hard for me to make the time to fish for them any more, just too many other things to fish for. Jim

This post edited by Jim Day 05/27/2008
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Tag and Release Sharks and Rays with the Pelagic Shark Research Foundation: We catch (tag and release) most of our sharks using nets however we are working to encourage sport light tackle anglers to carefully tag and release leopard sharks,smoothhound sharks, guitarfishes and thornback rays and have had some good results working up in San Francisco Bay and Monterey Bay and Elkhorn Slough. http://www.pelagic.org/slough/index.html If anyone is interested in supporting and getting involved with a tag and release program dont hesitate to contact us. We have tips (but not tippets) for those interested in tech, tactics and tackle for safely hooking up and landing these near shore denizens, fly fishing rigs work really well for these critters. Always be safe, sane and humane to both your crew and your quarry. Thanks, Sean S.R. Van Sommeran Executive Director/CEO The Pelagic Shark Research Foundation 831-459-9346 [email protected] WWW.PELAGIC.ORG Santa Cruz California Sinc 1990

This post edited by Team Pelagic 01/10/2009
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
She's (Andrea) been on our volunteer and staff rosters since 2002 and was one of our course instructors during the 2007 season, she worked on all three of our projects including the white shark project.



http://www.pelagic.org/slough/slough_staff.html



She's a pro.



She's a top-notch surfer as well.

All our staff are first rate.

Cheers,
Sean

S.R. Van SommeranExecutive
Director/CEO
Pleagic Shark Research Team
831-459-9346
[email protected]
WWW.PELAGIC.ORG
Santa Cruz California
Since 1990
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top